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Spaghetti Junction IgersbirminghamUK

With the famous spaghetti junction turning 50, the event has led to a flurry of media and photographic interest.  A rollercoaster of activity. Such a landmark event has already led to Heinz releasing a limited edition yellow-themed tin of Spaghetti pasta celebrating the anniversary  

I, also, found myself getting caught up in this rollercoaster of a celebration of the motorway junction.   Following on from my recent visit to the junction, IgersbirminghamUK organised a photographic meeting for the week of the celebrations.  Just under 40 photographers arrived on a Sunday morning to be briefed on the planned photographic walk under the M6.  The group photograph was a popular picture and was even featured by the national IgersUK Instagram page.  All the photographs taken during the walk may be found under the Instagram hashtag #igbuk_meet_spagjunction.   There are some very good pictures that show the relatively unseen world underneath the Spaghetti Junction.

Spaghetti Junction IgersbirminghamUK
IgersbirminghamUK participants
Spaghetti Junction IgersbirminghamUK
The quietness of the canal with the Junction in the distance (selected for the BBC England’s Big Picture).
Spaghetti Junction IgersbirminghamUK
A view of the columns holding up the Motorway.
Spaghetti Junction IgersbirminghamUK
Nature is reclaiming the area underneath the Spaghetti Junction.

The events of the meeting were recorded by the BBC and the report by reporter Laura Mcmullan featured interviews with me and other photographers.  Following the publication of the BBC news item, I was invited by the University of Birmingham to write an article on what lies below the Spaghetti Junction from a photographic viewpoint.

Although I was busy with the organisation of the meeting, I did have time to take a few pictures myself as featured in this blog.  I wonder what the place will be like in another 50 years.  Meanwhile, I know that I will be passing over the Junction in the future as I hurtle in and out of Birmingham.

Further links
BBC Midlands Today provides an account of the IgersbirminghamUK meeting
What’s underneath the Spaghetti Junction, Damien Walmsley, University of Birmingham.
My previous blog on Spaghetti Junction (50 years on) with more pictures.
Englands Big Picture 22nd May to the 29th May (my picture of the Spaghetti Junction)

Spaghetti Junction IgersbirminghamUK
The flyovers tower above you.

Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022

The Moor Pool Estate is a Garden Suburb in Harborne, Birmingham.  The estate was designed to be a low-density housing scheme and the concept was drawn up by John Sutton Nettleford who was the first Chairman of Birmingham’s town planning committee.  Moor Pool area has around 500 houses spread across 54 acres.  There are 6 different house styles  in the roads that link together across the estate.  The houses also take advantage of the contours of the land, and this gives pleasing views of the area. 

Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
The classic view of Moor Pool
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
A public bench at the start of Park Edge
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Ready to celebrate the Platinum Jubilee.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Reflections around the circle.

John Nettleford was appalled with the living conditions in the back to backs which were typical of the housing in the City.  Moor Pool Estate was seen as a solution that catered for the expanding urban population of Birmingham.  The policy of building garden suburbs ensured that people would enjoy access to clean air and green spaces.  The estate was built between 1907 and 1912 and is maintained by the Moor Pool Heritage Trust.  The area is an example of how Garden suburbs were planned to provide low-cost housing in a semi-rural environment.

Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Listed flats on Ravenhurst Road
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Houses on Margaret Grove.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
A different style on Moor Pool Lane

A visit to Moor Pool Estate was organised as an Instameet by IgersbirminghamUK.  Luckily it was a glorious sunny day.  We met at the entrance to the Hall and then walked around the Circle to overlook the tennis courts. This is where Louise Deakin who is the Education, Engagement and Outdoors Officer for the Trust gave us an enthusiastic account of the Moor Pool Estate past, present and future.  I learnt about the connection of the Nettleford family and Winterbourne House which was interesting.  Louise handed out an information leaflet that included a map of the area.  I have reproduced the map below as I can refer to it during my blog.

Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Taken from https://www.moorpoolhall.org.uk/images/Interpretation_Map.jpg
The Numbers relate to the information boards around the trail.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
The Moor Pool tennis courts
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Entrance to the Tennis courts.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
The tree at the junction of Margaret Grove and Moor Pool Lane

Once the briefing had finished, I wandered around the Circle and the tennis courts and the beginning of Carless Avenue.  Following this I made my way around to the shops on the circle.  There was a colourful banner celebrating the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee over the optician’s shop. My path went along Park Edge towards Margaret Grove and the listed flats on Ravenhurst Road.  There is a viewing point over Mill Pool giving a traditional view of the area.  It is these pictures that you first encounter when searching on the Internet about the Trust.  There was a person fishing in the pool and he had many photographs taken by the IgersbirminghamUK group.  Margaret Grove was very pretty with the houses nestling into the lie of the land.  I also discovered the various alleyways through the area.  Louise mentioned that these were not paths to personal properties but pathways to encourage the garden suburb approach.  Where Margaret Grove met Moor Pool Avenue are the Nettlefold Gardens and the Moorpool tennis club.  The latter being the second tennis club in the Trust.  I walked up to the disused railway line which is now a footpath.  Here the residents would have had train access to the City of Birmingham.  Moving back to the Circle via Moor Pool I encountered a few cats taking advantage of the warm sun.  The houses here are of a different style and sit up and away from the road. 

Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
The railway bridge at the edge of the trust.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
A higher view into the estate.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
The most photographed fisherman in Harborne.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Moor Pool Bowling Club.
Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
One of the many alleyways.

I caught up with the rest of the group and took one of the footpaths to the side of the Pool.  I took a few more pictures of the fisherman who was still there.  This footpath led onto the bowling green.  It is not a level crown surface as the picture shows so it must be a challenging game to play.  Back to the Circle to meet up the rest of the IgersbirminghamUK participants and we adjourned to Harborne high street to the pub and a chance to talk about our pictures and the ones that got away.

Moor Pool Heritage Trust, Igersbirmingham Instameet, 2022
Back to the start at Moor Pool Hall on the Circle.


Thank you to Louise Deakin and the Moor Pool Heritage Trust for inviting us to their home.  I enjoyed the visit, and hope that these pictures along with those from IgersbirminghamUK will go a long way to advertising a real gem of a place to visit with a great history to match.

Please follow @igersbirminghamUK to learn more about our activities and upcoming Instameets. Thank you to Nicky Butler who organised this Instameet on behalf of the IgersbirminghamUK team. Thanks to Lena and John for their support of IgersbirminghamUK as well.

It was a beautiful day and some people took time to enjoy the sun.

Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham

I love exhibitions that think outside the box. The Sistine chapel exhibition is different. Whilst In Rome, I missed the opportunity to see the Sistine Chapel and wonder what the experience is like. Apparently it is very crowded and you spend your time looking upwards and at a distance at the great works of Michelangelo. It is still said to be a moving experience.

Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
God divides the water from the earth.

Meanwhile in a warehouse in deepest Digbeth, there is a Secret Space and it was here that 34 life sized reproductions of the frescos were displayed by the Fever exhibition company.  The pictures were arranged around two large rooms and there was an audio accompaniment to each fresco. Some pictures were hung on the ceiling with the majority on the sides of the warehouse.

Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
The Creation of Adam
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
Taking a picture
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
The Ceiling of the Warehouse in Digbeth.

There was ample space to move around and take pictures. My friend Monsignor Danny McHugh religiously followed the audio narrative. I chose to jump back and forth taking pictures of both the exhibition and the observers. It was an enjoyable experience.  A church like atmosphere was maintained throughout by the use of choral music.  I found that I came away with an enhanced understanding of how Michelangelo executed his paintings and the thought processes behind them.  There were some humorous parts of the narrative that accompanied the picture viewing. There were some nice attentions to detail and the staff were very friendly and helpful.

Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
David and Goliath
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
The Prophet Ezekiel
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
The Last Judgement
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
So much to take in
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
Looking upwards
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
Judith Slays Holofernes
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
Zechariah

Next I will visit the real Sistine Chapel but for now I hope you enjoy the pictures. If you can catch the exhibition in your own local town then I would recommend seeing it.

Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
In deepest Digbeth, the Secret Place, River Street
Sistine Chapel, Fever, Digbeth, Birmingham
Contemporary Art outside the Exhibition

The pictures were taken with both my Fujifilm x100v and my iPhone13. The mobile phone does a great job of low light situations but I like the control that the x100v gives me as well. I have the settings of the Fujifilm on Aperture priority and automatic ISO.


Spaghetti Junction March2022

What lies below is a theme for this and my next blog.  Spaghetti Junction is 50 years old in May 2022. Millions of car drivers pass over Spaghetti Junction as they hurtle past Birmingham.  Many are on the M6 heading north or south to their destination with no thought about what is below.  For others the Aston Expressway is the main northern route into Birmingham and is a spur off the Junction.  The sprawl of roads spit out cars to Erdington and 6 ways along the Tyburn Road.  People live in Gravelly Hill immediately adjacent to the junction.  The area is a mixture of concrete, noise and fumes.  The Junction celebrates 50 years in May and at the time was seen as a landmark construction.  Over the years it has become synonymous with Birmingham.

Spaghetti Junction March 2022
The layers of the Junction from the River Tame to the Signs for the Aston Expressway

As a photographer what lies below is much more interesting and is seldom seen from above.  The first part of the junction to investigate is Salford circus which is the link roundabout for many of the local roads to the motorway.  It is not clear what the planners had in mind but the inner pedestrian area of the junction is an unfriendly concrete jungle.  It is covered in litter and graffiti tagging.  It is not a place to visit alone and luckily my photographic colleague John Bray was with me.  The concrete pillars are giants holding up the roads above.  The area is under attack and the hero is nature as it attempts to reclaim the area.

Spaghetti Junction March 2022
What wonders what the planners had in mind for the underpasses.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
The sound of broken glass
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Nature is fighting back on the concrete.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Tagging and signs
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Having someone with you when visiting is essential.

Kicking our way through the rubbish we make ouir way through the underpasses and cross the busy junction to reach the canal access steps.  Running under the Motorway the canals also make a junction.  There is where three canals come together namely the Birmingham and Fazeley, the Tame Valley and the Birmingham and Warwick Junction canals.  Flowing alongside the canals is the River Tame.  The area has numerous bridges criss crossing the canal and the light peeks through vents above.  There are grafitti strewn around the place.  Cyclists and walkers move around in a surreal dance.  Walking eastwards the Motorway passes Star City and the area is reminiscent of many TV programmes.  This is probably because a great deal of car chase filming takes place around here. 

Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Concrete everywhere
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Access to the canal
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Starting to explore underneath.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
A view of the Star City entertainment complex
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
A place where many movies car chases are filmed.

Moving westwards there is a bridge tunnel where there is graffiti which in the past was renowned for its beauty and craftsmanship in previous years.  When we visited, there was just a white washed wall with a prison window.  I am unsure of the meaning of this painting.  The site is used as there is a shaft of light that comes down from above the junction onto the canalside.

Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Underneath the heart of the junction.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
The “prison window” graffiti.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Reflections and stagnations in the water.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
The deep green canal.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Traffic thunders above.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Constant repair of the road structure goes on.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Looking back along the canal.
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Bolts hold the roads together.

The canal path leads under all the roads that form the Junction and there is repair work on several of the bridges.  A path along the Aston Expressway eventually comes out onto Aston reservoir.  This is a hidden feature in the shadows of the Motorway.  It is relatively peaceful and a contrast to the distant noise of the traffic.  Moving along the perimeter and keeping the river Tame in view, there are trees and shrubs which are reclaiming the land underneath the tarmac.  This becomes the end of our journey underneath Spaghetti junction, and we head home back on the M6. 

Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Aston Reservoir
Spaghetti Junction March 2022
Spring Blossom against the concrete pillars.

There are likely to be birthday celebrations on its big 50 birthday but meanwhile here is a BBC link celebrating 40 years.


Reflections in Birmingham

I love National Geographic Traveller UK magazine and I am always tagging my pictures with their hashtag #NGTUK in the hope of being featured. My persistence paid off and my picture of a person walking along Regency Wharf in Gas Street Basin was featured first on Instagram and then in the April edition of the magazine. It just shows that you do not have to travel far to get featured in a travel magazine.

Oozell's Square Blossom Birmingham

Oozells square in the westside of Birmingham is unremarkable other than the IKON gallery which is on one side of the square. The IKON is a highly acclaimed contemporary art venue and when you have finished looking over the latest exhibits, take a well earned rest in Yorks coffee shop.  However in the months of March and April the square erupts with cherry blossom and becomes one of the most photographed squares in Birmingham.  I also took many photographs.  The square was featured in a BBC news and my photograph was included.  I have also added a few more of my own in this post.

Oozell's Square Blossom Birmingham
A favourite reflection is produced around the water feature
Oozell's Square Blossom Birmingham
the blossom turns and ordinary square into the extraordinary.
Oozell's Square Blossom Birmingham
A traditional view of the blossom with the IKON in the background.
Oozell's Square Blossom Birmingham
Another traditional view of the blossom in the square.

Further links include
The IKON gallery
Yorks Cafe

If you would like to see previous entries on this square then please visit
Blosson in Oozells Square
Cherry blossom experiments

Reflections in Birmingham

There have been many opportunities over the last couple of weeks to take pictures that rely on reflections. Surface water from all the rain leads to puddles on footpaths and pavements that are a good source for taking reflective pictures. Modern cameras have a flip screen that allow you to get low and take the picture without having to get too uncomfortable on the floor. The placement of the lenses has to be very low to take advantage of the reflective split. On the iPhone 13, the positioning of the lenses allows you to get closer to the water. However take care as in doing this you will find your mobile phone getting a little wet! Straight after the rain, I am always looking for a new angle for my photography using reflections from the water and here are a few examples. Most of them are taken with the iPhone camera. However during the visit to Upton House near Banbury, I discovered a very large reflective pool in the garden that provided a wonderful opportunity for a reflection.

Upton House March 2022
The reflecting pool, Upton House and Garden.
This was featured on the lunchtime weather news of BBC South.

There was some local and national successes with several of these pictures being picked up on Instagram by both National Geographic Traveller and BBC weather watchers. Some were successfully featured in local instagram pages. There are explanations behind all the images shown and whilst you are reading this blog post, I am still on the look out for reflections.

Reflections taken in Birmingham
Taken on a wet night in Birmingham looking up towards the Bullring.
This was featured on the Birmingham.City Instagram pages.
Reflections at Umberslade Estate
The line up of trees at Umberslade Estate becomes the perfect setting for a puddle reflection.
Reflections at Moor Street Station
Waiting for the train home and I happened to catch these puddle reflections which were perfectly placed for the picture.
Reflections in Birmingham
A classic view of the IKON gallery in Oozells Square. The “river” of water provides the reflection.
Reflections in Birmingham
A puddle in Gas Street Basin provides a great reflection. He looks like he is walking on water.
This was featured on the National Geographic UK traveller Instagram pages.

Osman Selfridges Story

Selfridges is always on my list as a building to photograph. It has featured in many of my picture books over the years. I have even written a blog about the building which includes several of my pictures. The building is striking with the discs spread over an amorphous design. I love the building and it has come to be one of the iconic images of the City. I also like shopping in the store as the interior design is appealing but that is another story. If you want to know more, there are several good sources of information about the design and history of the architectural design.

Osman Selfridges Story
Sunset fire over Selfridges and look closely some discs are missing
Osman Selfridges Story
Missing disc highlighted by the sunrise

In 2020, problems with the attachment of the discs to the building began to surface and this is evident in my pictures. A decision was made by Selfridges to undertake the refurbishment and replacement of all the discs on the building. There are 15,000 discs and it will take some time to replace them. The original makers of the discs no longer exist and new constructors were required. The story may be followed up in the news media when in November 2020, the official reports of the replacement began.

It was during Lockdown #2 that scaffolding began to go up around the store. So as to protect the construction workers and the scaffolding, an eye-catching temporary skin has been put in place. The striking art structure is called “Infinity pattern 1” and is designed by Birmingham born artist and interdisciplinary designer, Osman Yousefzada. It is intended to be a “message of hope” to the people of Birmingham. The design was drawn up in conjunction with the IKON Gallery. The colours are striking and are best viewed in the sunlight which picks up the shades of red. The installation is temporary as the replacement of all the discs will be completed in time for the Commonwealth games in 2022. Therefore whilst it is on view, I encourage you to wander down to Birmingham and see Osman’s creation. The visit will be worthwhile.

These photographs show how Osman’s artwork interacts with the City and the people. The pictures tell the story of the loss of the discs, the placement of the scaffolding and the final structure. There is merchandise in the store that feature the Infinity Pattern 1 on them. The colours and the design pattern lend themselves to pictures and I like the picture with my daughter looking out over Birmingham with the Infinity Pattern 1 behind her.

Osman Selfridges Story
My daughter looks out over the street below.
Osman Selfridges Story
A favourite Birmingham viewpoint. This time with Osman’s Infinity Pattern 1.

I have included some web links for further reading
Birmingham Selfridges covered in huge artistic wrap
Osman Yousefzada at Selfridges Birmingham

Osman Selfridges Story
Examples of the various merchandise that can be brought designed with the Infinity Pattern 1

UoB Exchange IgersbirminghamUK

The University of Birmingham has a major economic impact on Birmingham and the West Midlands region.  The University educates students, is a major employer, a research leader in all sectors and a gateway bringing in global connections that benefit the city. Even though the University has a beautiful campus at Edgbaston, a physical footprint in the city centre has long been on the University’s wish list.  The old Municipal Savings Bank began to look an interesting project.  Especially with the location of the bank on the new look Centennial square.   

Produced by the University of Birmingham

The former Municipal Bank is a Grade II listed building and has historical links with the University.  Joseph Chamberlain was founder and first Chancellor of the University of Birmingham.  Neville Chamberlain, the son of Joseph Chamberlain was behind the building of the Municipal Bank on Broad Street.  It was first opened by Prince George in 1933 and has a long history of underpinning the wealth of an ambitious city.  However, the bank closed at the turn of the century and the last 20 years has seen the building empty with no tenants. It was famously portrayed as the AC-12 base in the BBC series ‘Line of Duty’.  The iconic safe deposit boxes in the vault were used in a Chanel advert amongst the various roles that the bank filled in these barren years.  In 2018, the University negotiated a long lease of the building with Birmingham City Council and the renovations began.

I was fortunate in my University of Birmingham role to see these renovations firsthand in October 2019 before the pandemic.  During my visit, I took a series of pictures on my iPhone.  I had no idea which room I was photographing, although I remember the vaults where the safe deposit boxes reside.  They are so interesting to see.  Rows and rows of metal doors with numbers on them.  One can only begin to imagine what was contained within them.  The building was being gutted and there was so much to do from floor to ceiling in each room.

UoB Exchange
Banking floor

Fast forward to October 2021.  Hasan Patel who is part of Communications Team at the University of Birmingham invited me to coffee at the Exchange after his Marathon Run. (Follow Hasan on Twitter to learn how to sponsor him on his running diary). We spent an enjoyable couple of hours putting the world to right.  Hasan introduced me to the University team at the Exchange and we visited several rooms in the building. 

Not long after my visit with Hasan, IgersBirminghamUK announced an Instameet at the Exchange.  Immediately I signed up and went along.  This Instameet is a friendly collection of photographers.   We were given access to all areas including the Board room and the former bank managers office which I did not get to see on my first visit.  The other interesting feature is the balcony where the bank manager opened the doors and looked out onto the banking floor to check that the bank was running smoothly.  During the Instameet, this was a favourite spot for all the photographers.

Whilst we were in the vault, we were also given access to a utility room where many of the safety deposit boxes were stored.  Now many of the boxes are placed strategically around the building and are a feature of those rooms which are used as teaching spaces and meeting areas.  This basement room had many of the old boxes and proved to be a fantastic place to take photographs.  There were still some stickers remaining and on one of the boxes the notice stated that this box could only be opened in the presence of a solicitor.  Once again one could only imagine what was kept in these boxes over the years.

We finished the tour and adjourned to the Distillery Pub next to the Roundhouse.   This is another interesting place to visit and includes a wall mural of a canal horse painted by one my favourite street artists, Annatomix.   The Roundhouse was used to care for the canal horses that pulled the boats and has been renovated as a historical place of interest. There is even one of the horse stables on view.

This was a day taking pictures of historical buildings that have been brought up to date in a city that is rediscovering its roots and moving forward.  Thank you to the team at IgersBirminghamUK for organising the tour and The University of Birmingham for opening the Exchange for this Instameet.

I have also included a blending of the old and new photographs in two of the rooms to show how the building has been modernised between my two visits.

Pictures taken with iPhone 11 and 13, camera Fujifilm x100v

If you are interested in joining an IgersBirmingham Instameet then please follow them on Instagram. An account of a previous IgersBirmingham Instameet at Moseley Market is also available on my blog.


View of the City May 2021

Queensway is a busy arterial road in and out of Birmingham so there is always a high volume of traffic thundering along the tarmac.  With my telephoto lens and 24 to 70 mm lens, I went about taking different pictures of an area that is already very familiar to me.  New building projects are always happening in the city centre and the area between the Cathedral and the Canal was an old factory site.  It has been repurposed into city dwelling flats that are being built close to the canal.   

The area is also a magnet for different kinds of people and as I was taking pictures, I was hassled for money, so I quickly moved on.  It is something I am wary of when I am in the quieter parts of town.  I know that I do have to be careful of my own safety.  Still the lure of  taking a few photographs around the buildings on either side of Queensway won through.  I took pictures of St Chad’s Cathedral and also with my telephoto lens up past the Snow Hill buildings.  After that I made my way into town for a lunch time meeting. 

Parking on the top floor of Selfridges Car Park opposite the store provided skyline pictures of both the City and Digbeth, and the skyline bridge linking the two is always fun for a picture or two.    I love the new covering on the Selfridges which is being put in place whilst they replace the discs on the outside.  The covering is designed by Osman Yousefzada,who is a multi-disciplinary artist working in association with the IKON gallery. the pink and black geometric shapes are in contrast with the grey architecture.

It was a day of sunshine and showers and whilst I was outside there was a terrific downpour. 

This then led to the bonus of several puddles for a bit of reflective photography.  The puddles around Selfridges are still there and lend themselves to some nice reflections of the building as it is being renovated

On my way to New Street, there were other interesting images to capture including the queue outside Zara and the photographing of the Electric Cinema.  I lingered around the reflective roof of the entrance to New Street Station. I also took a few pictures of the trams passing through which is something you have to do when in Birmingham. 

So enjoy the pictures and it is good to see Birmingham as it emerges from the pandemic.  The only down side is the weather which is atrocious rain and so unlike May.


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